Saturday Double Feature: BlacKkKlansman (2018) and…

Hey! We’re back! And another Saturday means another Saturday Double Feature!

Okay, let’s start with a quick recap of the “rules”, shall we? The basic idea here is to take a movie that is out in theaters now, and pair it up with another movie from the 1980s or before. Sometimes the connection will be obvious, and sometimes it’ll be a little less so, but that’s part of the fun.

It looks like there will be two movies vying for the top spot this weekend, but the one that interests me most is Spoke Lee’s latest project, BlacKkKlansman,

Set in 1979, the movie, “based on a true story” (sorry, but I always put that in quotes, because quite often it means “I heard about this once from a friend of mine”) is the story of an African-American detective who tries to infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

The movie stars John David Washington (the son of Denzel as Detective Ron Stallworth and Adam Driver as Detective Flip  Zimmerman who is the white officer who provides a face for Stallworth when he is unable to avoid showing his.

Spike Lee can always be counted on to make interesting and provocative movies, and the fact that among the names of the producers are Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions and Jordan Peele, fresh off last year’s Get Out just serves to fuel my interest even more.

Here’s your trailer:

Of course, this is far from the first time the Klan has been depicted on screen, perhaps most famously in D. W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation. Instead of going with that one, though, I thought we’d take a look at a slightly different hate group Michigan’s Black Legion.

The 1937 film Black Legion stars Humphrey Bogart as Frank Taylor, a midwestern factory worker who is passed over for a promotion in favor of an immigrant friend. Taylor soon joins the ranks of the Black Legion (a pseudo KKK anti-immigrant group) who drive the immigrant from town, allowing Taylor to get the job he “deserves”.

From there, however, things actually start to go downhill for Taylor, who increasingly finds the Legion an outlet for his frustrations and hatred and an excuse to indulge his most vile impulses.

So what do you think? What would you choose for a double feature with BlacKkKlansman? Leave your thoughts in the comments, along with ideas of any other upcoming movies you’d like to see “double featured”. Consider it, if you will, your chance to challenge me to come up with an interesting pair.

Until next time, Happy Viewing!

Throwback Thursday -Old Time Radio: Bold Venture

Between this blog and my previous one, Professor Damian’s Public Domain Treasure Chest, I’ve been writing about movies for quite a while now. Because of that, there are a lot of posts that have simply gotten lost to the mists of time. So, I figured I’d use the idea of “Throwback Thursday” to spotlight some of those older posts, re-presenting them pretty much exactly as they first appeared except for updating links where necessary or possible, and doing just a bit of re-formatting to help them fit better into the style of this blog. Hope you enjoy these looks back. 

Before I started Throwback Thursday here, the Thursday feature was devoted to Old Time Radio, another of my favorite forms of entertainment, and a genre that unfortunately has died out, at least here in the U.S, though it does thrive in Britain and other countries to this day. Plus, there would often be a film ir Hollywood tie-in, as in today’s reprinted feature. So enjoy, and hey, if you’re interested in seeing a return of some kind of regular OTR feature, let me know.

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 Old Time Radio Thursdays – #005: Bold Venture (1951-1952)

The short intro: For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, Old Time Radio is the phrase generally used to refer to the time when radio was (mostly) live, and was full of a variety of different shows, as opposed to simply being a means for record labels to use robots to promote the top records of the day. Old Time Radio Thursdays is my chance to explore some of those old radio shows, their connections (both old and new) to movies, and hopefully to encourage some of the rest of you to take a look at a probably unfamiliar source of entertainment that I truly love. If you want more info on OTR, and some examples of the variety of shows that were made, be sure to check out this introductory post.

Bold Venture! Adventure! Intrigue! Mystery! Romance! Starring Humphrey Bogart! And Lauren Bacall! Together in the sultry setting of tropical Havana and the mysterious islands of the Caribbean. Bold Venture! Once again, the magic names of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall bring you Bold Venture and a tale of mystery and intrigue…

51-04-10-Storz-Beer-spot-adHumphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall together on the radio? In a weekly dramatic adventure show? Set in the Caribbean? Yep, that’s exactly what Bold Venture promised, and that’s exactly what it delivered.

1951 had to have been a busy year for one of Hollywood’s most popular couples. Bacall was pregnant with the couple’s second child, and they would soon be off to “deepest darkest Africa” where Bogie would be filming his Academy Award winning turn as Charlie Allnut in The African Queen. Nonetheless, the couple managed to record 30 episodes of the radio show before their departure, and supposedly another 48 upon their return.

Bold Venture is the story of Slate Shannon (Bogart), who runs a hotel and fishing boat rental service in Havana and his “ward”/sidekick/possible love interest Gail “Sailor” Duval (Bacall) as they scrape and scrap their way through stories involving everything from spies to lost love. The setting obviously was designed explicitly for the couple, as “Shannon’s Place” might just as well be “Rick’s Cafe” from Casablanca, and the fishing boat set-up is obviously a combination of To Have and Have Not and Key Largo.

1-bold-ventureIn reality, however, the show probably could have been set almost anywhere, because the real draw for listeners, and the real appeal, is obviously the interaction between the two stars, and in that aspect the show definitely doesn’t disappoint. The natural chemistry between the two shines through, even when the scripts are on the weak side or when the plot becomes somewhat muddled. This is definitely a show where the leads were able to bring even a mediocre script – and there were, unfortunately, more than one of those, though when the writing shines, it really does shine – to a much higher level. Which is exactly what one would expect from stars of this calibre and level of intimacy.

Speaking of stars, special note also has to go out to supporting actor Jester Hairston who played “King” Moses on the show. If Bogart was reprising Rick Blaine, then King was his Sam, and one of the more intriguing aspects of the show was that after the first commercial break, King would provide the listener with an up-to-this-point plot summary in the form of a calypso verse, which was an interesting way to play up the Cuban setting even when the script really didn’t otherwise call for or allow much reference to the island nation.

One thing that you may have noticed earlier when I noted the number of episodes recorded before and after the shooting of The African Queen is that I said “supposedly another 48 upon their return”. Bold Venture is what was known as a syndicated series, meaning that rather than going out live, the episodes would be recorded before hand and then sent out (usually on lacquer disks) to the local stations who would then slot them into their schedules with local sponsors buying individual spots. Unfortunately, this has led to some confusion over just how many episodes were actually produced, the sequence they were aired in, the dates they would have originally aired, and even the titles given to the episodes. This is unfortunately the case with many radio shows of the period, especially since the disks themselves were often supposed to be destroyed after their broadcast – remember, this was a time when there was no secondary market for these programs, and there was no value seen in the shows beyond their initial broadcast.

Humphrey-Bogart-Lauren-Bacall-1This has led to the unfortunate situation where many of these early radio shows are simply lost to our generation, and many of the ones that do survive exist only in the form of recordings made of the actual on-air broadcasts by enthusiasts who would set up tape machines to capture their favorite shows. Also it means that those trying to research these shows often have to piece together snippets of information or advertisements from various newspapers or magazines in order to try to make some sense of exactly which shows do still exist and other information about them.

In the specific case of Bold Venture, the syndicator’s records indicate that a total of 78 shows were recorded, but of those only 57 have been verified to still exist and are “in circulation” – meaning they are available to collectors and/or listeners. There may very well be more recordings out there, but if so, they are either in the hands of private collectors or may even simply be sitting on a shelf without the owner even realizing the treasure they have.

This is, of course, yet another thing that these old radio shows have in common with early films and television shows.

Anyway, we fortunately do have those 57 shows available to listen to, and the full collection of them can be found here.

And now, once again, I invite you to sit back, close your eyes, and let the magic of Bogart, Bacall, and Old Time Radio take you on your own Bold Venture.

As always, I hope you’ve enjoyed this little trip into radio’s past, and today’s focus on Bold Venture. Next week? Well, next week we’ll take a look at one of Hollywood’s most notable horror icons as he steps into a much more… “saintly” role.

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Hope you enjoyed this blast from the past.

Saturday Double Feature: Sabotage (2014) and…

Saturday on the blog means Saturday Double Feature, right? Remember, the basic idea here is to take a movie that is out in theaters now, and pair it up with another movie from the 1980s or before. Sometimes the connection will be obvious, and sometimes it’ll be a little less so, but that’s part of the fun.

I’ll admit that this week’s double feature was a harder one to come up with than usual, largely because I was rather uninspired by this week’s crop of new films. That’s not to say there aren’t some movies out there that I’m wanting to see – there definitely are – just nothing that immediately cause me to say “Hey, that would make a good double bill with…”. It wasn’t until I got to thinking about the actual themes of the movies that I finally was able to settle on an idea for this week.

So’ okay, let’s start with this week’s new movie, the  new Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle Sabotage.

The idea behind this movie seems to be one of “who can you trust?”, especially when members of his team start getting killed off one-by one. All right then, that got me to thinking about other “who do you trust” movies, especially where great amounts of money are involved, which immediately brought to mind the classic – and one of the best movies ever made – Humphrey Bogart-starring The Treasure of the Sierra Madre form 1959.

And looking at those two trailers together, I think yeah, that actually would probably make for a pretty good double feature.

So what do you think? Are you looking forward to or have you already seen Sabotage? Do you have any other ideas for pairing films with it? If so, let me know below. And also let me know of any other upcoming movies you’d like to see “double featured”. Consider it, if you will, your chance to challenge me to come up with an interesting pair.

Until next time, Happy Viewing!

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Old Time Radio Thursdays – #034: Screen Guild Theater (1939-1952)

The short intro: For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, Old Time Radio is the phrase generally used to refer to the time when radio was (mostly) live, and was full of a variety of different shows, as opposed to simply being a means for record labels to use robots to promote the top records of the day. Old Time Radio Thursdays is my chance to explore some of those old radio shows, their connections (both old and new) to movies, and hopefully to encourage some of the rest of you to take a look at a probably unfamiliar source of entertainment that I truly love. If you want more info on OTR, and some examples of the variety of shows that were made, be sure to check out this introductory post.

sgt1The Screen Guild Theater was one of those oddities of Old Time Radio that actually had a number of different “official” titles during its run, mostly based on its current sponsor, and was heard on different networks at various times throughout its very long run.

It started out as The Gulf Screen Guild Show, then over the years morphed into The Gulf Screen Guild Theater, The Lady Esther Screen Guild Theater and The Camel Screen Guild Theater.

The show began its run on January 8, 1939 on the CBS network,  where it was a fixture until June 28, 1948. It was then picked up by NBC which began airing episodes on October 7, 1948, lasting until June 29, 1950. ABC was next to pick up the show, and it ran on that network from September 7, 1950 to May 31, 1951. Then finally it returned to CBS on March 13, 1952, where it lasted until the end of its run on June 29, 1952

sgt3Taken together, over the many years, networks, and incarnations, it amassed a total of 527 episodes, and despite those changes, the format of the show basically remained the same. It was an anthology series which brought in leading Hollywood actors to star in adaptations of then-popular motion pictures. Among those appearing on the show over the years were: Frank Sinatra, Gary Cooper, Clark Gable, Ethel Barrymore, Agnes Moorehead, Humphrey Bogart, Lionel Barrymore, Ingrid Bergman, Humphrey Bogart, Eddie Cantor, Bing Crosby, Bette Davis, Jimmy Durante, Nelson Eddy, Douglas Fairbanks Jr.Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Gregory Peck, Fred Astaire, and Dinah Shore.

Perhaps the most unique feature of the show was that the actors appearing on it would actually pass up taking the usual paycheck they would typically receive for making such an appearance, and instead, the money would be donated to the Motion Picture Relief Fund, which supported the creation and maintenance of the Motion Picture Country Home for retired actors.

Great actors appearing on a great show recreating great movies for  great cause. No wonder it was able to last so long.

The following videos each compiles three episodes into one block, so they should give you a good taste of the show:

By the way: those interested in a complete listing of all of the shows featured in the series, and the stars that appeared can find one here.

Until next time, as always, Happy Listening!

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Top 250 Tuesday #085 – Casablanca (1942)

Continuing to wend my way through the Sight and Sound Top 250 Greatest Movies of All Time. This week, it’s #085 on the list, Michael Curtizs Casablanca. For a longer introduction to this series and a look at the full list, just click here. And if you want a heads-up on what I’ll be watching for next week in case you want to watch along, just head on over to the Facebook page or follow me on Twitter (both of those links are in the sidebar) where I’ll generally be posting that info later in the day.

cas1It seems like quite a few of the films that I have written about lately in this count-around (it’s not really a count down, since I’m not taking them in any particular order) have fit into the category of films that are extremely familiar, and indeed part of our shared cultural lexicon, and yet that there are a lot of people (myself often included) that have not actually seen the movie.

Casablanca, it appears, is just such a movie.

Recently I had a chance to watch a gorgeous 4K restoration of the film, thanks to our local independent movie house, the wonderful Belcourt Theatre. When I went, I was accompanied by my 13-year old daughter and a couple of older (than me) friends, and while we were there, we met up with a couple of friends who are younger than I am. Not exactly a completely random grouping, but probably a fairly indicative sampling of the crowd that was there.

It turns out that of the six of us only two (myself and one of my younger friends, who is even more film-knowledgeable than I am) had actually watched the movie all the way through before. If you expand that out, you could make the guess that fully two-thirds of the people in that crowd had never seen the entire movie (and yes, I know, I’m being completely unscientific about this, and using completely anecdotal evidence, but I honestly do suspect that, if anything, the actual number might even be a little higher).

humphrey bogart & dooley wilson - casablanca 1943Now I don’t want you to get the wrong idea here. I’m not casting aspersions on anyone. There are lots of movies that I’ve never seen, and a lot of them are ones that cause friends of mine to look at me askance as if to ask “Really?! How can that be?”. But, at the same time, we’re talking about Casablanca here, one of the most quoted, most referenced, most well-known films of all-time, a film that is truly part of the cultural zeitgeist.

Or at least it was. During the 20th century. Now? Hmmm… I wonder.

Part of the problem with Casablanca today was somewhat epitomized, I think, in the discussion that my daughter and I had after the screening. Now you have to understand that though she is only 13, she has embraced the concept of going to a lot of these older movies with me, and quite often will either ask to see something that surprises me, or, say, if we see a trailer for something that’s upcoming will surprise me with her choices, so it’s not like she doesn’t have a background with older black and white movies. And yet, when it came to Casablanca, it seems it left her less enthralled than the rest of us, and she actually said that it felt “slow” to her.

cas4As we talked about it further, and as I reflected on her response to the film a couple of thoughts occurred to me. Now again I want to note that I haven’t really had a chance to discuss these thoughts with her, so I may be off base, but there are two things that occur to me.

First, Casablanca is a very “adult” film. I don’t mean that in the way that it is most often used, in the way that, say Goodfellas or some other R-rated (or even unrated) movies are considered “adult”, but in its basic themes of loss and sacrifice, especially where love is concerned. That is to say, even though on the surface there is always the simmering tension between Rick and Ilsa and Lazlo, and even though at many moments the screenplay does veer very close to the edge of the melodramatic will they or won’t they, in the end, it’s the overarching theme of inevitable loss that really sets the movie’s tone. Yes, there is a “happy” ending, but it is an ending that come with a price for nearly everyone involved, and I wonder if that sense of loss, and an ability to relate to that, isn’t something that only comes with… well, if not with age, at least with a certain bit of experience, with having dealt with that kind of loss that younger people who have not yet been through those circumstances, who have not felt that pain and lived with it simply cannot really relate to yet.

Image: FILE PHOTO: 70 Years Since The Casablanca World Premiere CasablancaPerhaps that is why, as the “The End” card came up, and my daughter caught the sadness on my face, her response was not agreement, but surprise that the end of the movie had affected me as much as it had. Because for her it was much more about the plot, which, it’s true, the end twist is telegraphed so far ahead that it seemed really to only be played out, for her, in an overly drawn-out fashion, as opposed to what I was reacting to, which was the atmosphere and the performances and the dialogue that make that ending so much more than just “who’s getting on the plane?”

Secondly, there is the setting itself. Not so much the city of Casablanca, that is set up very well, but rather the fact that, as we are now well over a decade into the 21st century, World War II is not only history, but it is ancient history. By that I mean that while even for me the war was over almost twenty years before I was born, for almost anyone younger, especially those born after, say, the years of Vietnam, the War, and the restrictions and deprivations that it brought about, the atrocities and the fear are almost entirely unrelatable, and the film might as well be set in ancient Greece. It is certainly not as immediate as it would have been for viewers back in its own time, nor is it something that is still even a part of the collective, shared conciousness that it would have been for those of my generation who grew up knowing those who had actually been a part of it.

ricks-cafe-americainEven the mere concept of the need for letters of transit, or the tension between the Germans and the French resistance, which make up the central focus of the film really become more and more something that has to be explained outside of the context of the film or absorbed and expounded upon within it and are not something that any audience today is likely to have any innate knowledge of. So I wonder where that puts lines like “We’ll always have Paris”, which of course, has its own textual meaning, but loses much of its subtext when there isn’t that emotional resonance that accompanies the knowledge that come with the fact that the train that Rick is getting on really is the last train out of the city before the German invasion, and that there is no chance that Ilsa could simply catch up to him later due to the invasion of the city by the Germans.

So where, then, does that leave a movie like Casablanca, I wonder? Because it is a film that, although it is often spoken of as timeless, and in a way it certainly is, is also very much a product of, and inured in, it’s time. In the years to come, will it continue to be one of those movies that “everyone” has seen or at least “knows” even if they haven’t seen the entire film, or will it eventually become another one of those movies that was once considered essential viewing for anyone and everyone, but is now simply a cultural artifact, lost to the sands of time, seen only by those who like to dig to find those films that they have heard of or people who, like I have with so many of the films on this particular list, run across it in a certain context and decide to “give it a try”?

I suppose that’s a question we’ll only be able to answer as time goes by.

(Yeah, sorry, I couldn’t resist.)

So what are your thoughts on Casablanca? Is it a movie that you’ve seen or would like to? If you have seen it, is it one that would make your own Top 10 list? Or would it not even crack your Top 250? Also, I’m curious about what you think about my argument that some movies simply have to be seen on the big screen before one can even really judge them. And if you agree with it, what films you would put into that category. Let me know in the comments below.

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Sunday Classic Trailer Picks 005: Basket Case (1982 ) and Shakma! (1990)

ShakmaOkay, let’s be honest: neither Basket Case nor Shakma! are actually “classics”. Well, not in any traditional sense of the word, anyway.

And as far as the trailers go, well… Let’s just put it like this: our local “arthouse”, “revival”, “alternative”, whatever you want to call it theater showed them in front of this week’s midnight showing of Escape from New York this weekend, and they are going to be showing them as part of their October line-up, and the crowd there ate them up, and I heard lots of murmurs of “Oh, yeah!”, and “I’m definitely coming for that!”, so unintentionally hilarious or not, one can’t deny that they actually do what a trailer is supposed to do: put the butts in the seats.

Of course, that may also say as much about the crowd that goes to the Belcourt’s midnight movies as it does about the trailers themselves, but in the end, if they work, they work.

So what do you think? Do these trailers make you want to see the movies?  And do you know of any really good trailers? Or are there any classic films you’d like to see trailers for?   Let me know in the comment below.

Until next time, Happy Viewing!

Sunday Classic Trailer Picks 004: The African Queen (1951)

african_queen_xlgLet’s face it, the purpose of a trailer is to sell a movie. To put butts in seats. And one of the best ways to do that is through the use of hyperbole.

See something you’ve never seen before!

This is the greatest [whatever genre the movie falls into] film of all time!

You won’t believe your eyes!

You won’t believe your ears!

You won’t believe your fingers!

You won’t believe somebody put up the money to make this movie!

Of course, few films can actually live up to all the hype that surrounds them before they come out. Fortunately, some do. One of those is 1951’s The African Queen.

What do you think? Does the trailer make you want to see the film? Does it live up to this amount of hype? And do you know of any really good trailers? Or are there any classic films you’d like to see trailers for?   Let me know in the comment below.

Until next time, Happy Viewing!

Old Time Radio Thursdays – #005: Bold Venture (1951-1952)

The short intro: For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, Old Time Radio is the phrase generally used to refer to the time when radio was (mostly) live, and was full of a variety of different shows, as opposed to simply being a means for record labels to use robots to promote the top records of the day. Old Time Radio Thursdays is my chance to explore some of those old radio shows, their connections (both old and new) to movies, and hopefully to encourage some of the rest of you to take a look at a probably unfamiliar source of entertainment that I truly love. If you want more info on OTR, and some examples of the variety of shows that were made, be sure to check out this introductory post.

Bold Venture! Adventure! Intrigue! Mystery! Romance! Starring Humphrey Bogart! And Lauren Bacall! Together in the sultry setting of tropical Havana and the mysterious islands of the Caribbean. Bold Venture! Once again, the magic names of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall bring you Bold Venture and a tale of mystery and intrigue…

51-04-10-Storz-Beer-spot-adHumphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall together on the radio? In a weekly dramatic adventure show? Set in the Caribbean? Yep, that’s exactly what Bold Venture promised, and that’s exactly what it delivered.

1951 had to have been a busy year for one of Hollywood’s most popular couples. Bacall was pregnant with the couple’s second child, and they would soon be off to “deepest darkest Africa” where Bogie would be filming his Academy Award winning turn as Charlie Allnut in The African Queen. Nonetheless, the couple managed to record 30 episodes of the radio show before their departure, and supposedly another 48 upon their return.

Bold Venture is the story of Slate Shannon (Bogart), who runs a hotel and fishing boat rental service in Havana and his “ward”/sidekick/possible love interest Gail “Sailor” Duval (Bacall) as they scrape and scrap their way through stories involving everything from spies to lost love. The setting obviously was designed explicitly for the couple, as “Shannon’s Place” might just as well be “Rick’s Cafe” from Casablanca, and the fishing boat set-up is obviously a combination of To Have and Have Not and Key Largo.

1-bold-ventureIn reality, however, the show probably could have been set almost anywhere, because the real draw for listeners, and the real appeal, is obviously the interaction between the two stars, and in that aspect the show definitely doesn’t disappoint. The natural chemistry between the two shines through, even when the scripts are on the weak side or when the plot becomes somewhat muddled. This is definitely a show where the leads were able to bring even a mediocre script – and there were, unfortunately, more than one of those, though when the writing shines, it really does shine – to a much higher level. Which is exactly what one would expect from stars of this calibre and level of intimacy.

Speaking of stars, special note also has to go out to supporting actor Jester Hairston who played “King” Moses on the show. If Bogart was reprising Rick Blaine, then King was his Sam, and one of the more intriguing aspects of the show was that after the first commercial break, King would provide the listener with an up-to-this-point plot summary in the form of a calypso verse, which was an interesting way to play up the Cuban setting even when the script really didn’t otherwise call for or allow much reference to the island nation.

One thing that you may have noticed earlier when I noted the number of episodes recorded before and after the shooting of The African Queen is that I said “supposedly another 48 upon their return”. Bold Venture is what was known as a syndicated series, meaning that rather than going out live, the episodes would be recorded before hand and then sent out (usually on lacquer disks) to the local stations who would then slot them into their schedules with local sponsors buying individual spots. Unfortunately, this has led to some confusion over just how many episodes were actually produced, the sequence they were aired in, the dates they would have originally aired, and even the titles given to the episodes. This is unfortunately the case with many radio shows of the period, especially since the disks themselves were often supposed to be destroyed after their broadcast – remember, this was a time when there was no secondary market for these programs, and there was no value seen in the shows beyond their initial broadcast.

Humphrey-Bogart-Lauren-Bacall-1This has led to the unfortunate situation where many of these early radio shows are simply lost to our generation, and many of the ones that do survive exist only in the form of recordings made of the actual on-air broadcasts by enthusiasts who would set up tape machines to capture their favorite shows. Also it means that those trying to research these shows often have to piece together snippets of information or advertisements from various newspapers or magazines in order to try to make some sense of exactly which shows do still exist and other information about them.

In the specific case of Bold Venture, the syndicator’s records indicate that a total of 78 shows were recorded, but of those only 57 have been verified to still exist and are “in circulation” – meaning they are available to collectors and/or listeners. There may very well be more recordings out there, but if so, they are either in the hands of private collectors or may even simply be sitting on a shelf without the owner even realizing the treasure they have.

This is, of course, yet another thing that these old radio shows have in common with early films and television shows.

Anyway, we fortunately do have those 57 shows available to listen to, and the full collection of them can be found here.

And now, once again, I invite you to sit back, close your eyes, and let the magic of Bogart, Bacall, and Old Time Radio take you on your own Bold Venture.

As always, I hope you’ve enjoyed this little trip into radio’s past, and today’s focus on Bold Venture. Next week? Well, next week we’ll take a look at one of Hollywood’s most notable horror icons as he steps into a much more… “saintly” role.