Throwback Thursday – The Outlaw (1943)

Between this blog and my previous one, Professor Damian’s Public Domain Treasure Chest, I’ve been writing about movies for quite a while now. Because of that, there are a lot of posts that have simply gotten lost to the mists of time. So, I figured I’d use the idea of “Throwback Thursday” to spotlight some of those older posts, re-presenting them pretty much exactly as they first appeared except for updating links where necessary or possible, and doing just a bit of re-formatting to help them fit better into the style of this blog. Hope you enjoy these looks back.

Since the big movie opening this past weekend was the remake of The Magnificent Seven, I thought it might be appropriate to take a look back at one of the most notorious westerns of it’s time. Thus this post from The Professor’s page from 2010. I should note that the original post had a different clip, and I’ve edited the text slightly in introducing the new one. Other than that, it remains as written then.

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Monday Oaters – The Outlaw (1943) – Starring Jane Russell

out1bHiya, kiddies! Your ol’ host with the most Professor Damian here. Y’know, when you’ve got a western that features Billy the Kid, Doc Holliday and Pat Garrett, you’ve most likely got a winner. But, when you’ve got a western where all three of those gunslingers are overshadowed by their love interest’s outrageous endowments well, then you’ve not only got a winner, but you’ve got a lot of controversy. And that’s the story of today’s feature.

Produced in 1941 by famed recluse Howard Hughes, on paper, The Outlaw is actually a fairly typical B-grade western. In the movie, Pat Garrett (Thomas Mitchell) is the newly appointed sheriff of the town of Lincoln, New Mexico. One day he is visited by his old friend Doc Holliday (Walter Huston) who is tracking down a stolen horse. It turns out that the horse was stolen by none other than Billy the Kid (Jack Buetel). When they meet up, the two become fast friends, and when Billy is subsequently shot Doc decides to take him to recover at the home of his (Doc’s) girlfriend Rio (Jane Russell). Unfortunately, that’s where the real trouble begins, both for the characters and for the production itself.

Rio, you see, is played by Jane Russell. Now, Hughes, realising where the real draw of the picture was, decided not only to feature Ms Russell, but to do so in the most provocative ways that he thought he could at the time. Therefore we see the definitely full-figured Ms. Russell in a number of low-cut or open-necked blouses. and in a number of “damsel in distress” type situations, including at one point being bound between two trees.

out1aUnfortunately, this envelope-pushing by Hughes and Russell was more than those in charge of enforcing the Hays Code could tolerate. They insisted on Hughes cutting at a number of scenes, most of which featured Ms. Russell’s bosom. Even with the cuts, however, Hughes had trouble finding distributors willing to handle the film. Finally Hughes decided to stoke the flames of controversy himself, and the resultant outcry caused the film to finally be booked in New York. It only played for one week, however, before the censorship board exerted more pressure on the theaters and it was withdrawn. Finally given a wide release in 1946, the film, likely due in large part to its scandalous reputation, went on to be a box-office success.

For viewers today, of course, considering some of the images that are projected onto the silver screen in our local multiplexes, it may be hard to see what all the fuss was about. However, there is one thing that definitely stands the test of time in this film, and that is Ms. Russell’s beauty.

Once again, I wasn’t able to track down a proper trailer for the movie online, but here’s a series of clips that… well, I suppose you could substitute the word “bust” for “best” and it would work just as well. Anyway, it should give you a pretty good feel for the flick:

Ok, I guess it’s time for the skinny:
Title: The Outlaw
Release Date: 1943
Running Time: 116 min.
Black and White
Stars: Jane Russell
Directors: Howard Hughes, Howard Hawks (uncredited)
Producer: Howard Hughes

Until next time, Happy Treasure Hunting,
-Professor Damian

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Hope you enjoyed this blast from the past.

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